Misinformation Engineering

Essays and commentary on a variety of topics including textbooks on strength training, debunking myths of strength training, and the like.

Reverse Engineering Injury Mechanism and the Consequences of Forward Engineering

Reverse Engineering Injury Mechanism and the Consequences of Forward Engineering Andrew ‘Bud’ Charniga Sportivnypress.com Squatting under and receiving a heavy barbell at high speed without negative consequences; disproves the common myth ligaments and joints are susceptible to injury from fast, large range of motion exercises. Charniga photo. Five previous essays explored the possibility of a …

Reverse Engineering Injury Mechanism and the Consequences of Forward Engineering Read More »

A Myth of Olympic Weightlifting

A Myth of Olympic Weightlifting Andrew ‘Bud’ Charniga www.sportivnypress.com   Figure 1. Weightlifters are able to react in the event of unanticipated circumstances and avoid injury because of their dynamic training and elasticity. They develop injury avoidance mechanisms  from their training. The overwhelming majority of exercises are dynamic: fast contraction conjoined with rapid relaxation of …

A Myth of Olympic Weightlifting Read More »

Practical solutions to the problem of Achilles rupture and the proliferation of injuries to the lower extremities of football players

Part II:  Practical solutions to the problem of Achilles rupture and the proliferation of injuries to the lower extremities of football players Andrew ‘Bud’ Charniga “If you stretch a spring and release it, it will spring back.” R.McN. Alexander, 1988 Figure 1. NFL quarterback fractures right fibula falling from tackle of opposite leg. You can’t …

Practical solutions to the problem of Achilles rupture and the proliferation of injuries to the lower extremities of football players Read More »

Achilles Tendon Ruptures and the NFL

Reverse Engineering Injury Mechanism: Achilles Tendon Ruptures and the NFL Andrew Charniga SportivnyPress.com 2016 “The speed at which animals can turn depends on the forces involved in cornering, and larger animals need to produce greater forces for any given turn. However, larger animals can apply relatively less force than smaller animals for turns and so …

Achilles Tendon Ruptures and the NFL Read More »

It’s All Connected: Part II

In this photo the leg spring mechanism of this female weightlifter as in the previous example, releases such that hip knee, ankle and feet bend to redistribute and dissipate the mechanical energy of the body and the barbell. Joints bend, muscles, tendons and ligaments elongate elastically. These same tissues absorb the force of the falling barbell, only to recoil so that the forces are not concentrated in the joints.

Its All Connected Part II Andrew Charniga, Jr. Sportivnypress.com© A logical critique of: “Rational and Implementation of Anterior Ligament Injury Prevention Warm – UP Programs in Female Athletes”, D. P. Bien, 2011 J Strength & Cond Research 25(1): 271 – 285, 2011 As has been already noted the central thesis of the article which inspired …

It’s All Connected: Part II Read More »