Competition Reports

The 2013 Asian Weightlifting Championships: Women

The 2013 Asian Weightlifting Championships

Astana, Kazakhstan

June 20-26, 2013

Andrew Charniga, Jr.

Sportivny Press©

 

The 2013 Asian Weightlifting Championships were held in the velodrome arena on the Saryarka sports complex in Astana, the capital city of Kazakhstan. A combination competition venue for cycling and hotel, the facility also housed an Olympic sized swimming pool with saunas and fitness center. The plan is to hold the 2014 Worlds championships in this arena/hotel complex.

 

There was a relatively small turnout for this competition due in no small part to its proximity to the Universiade in Kazan, generally less money available only ten months after the Olympic Games and the effects of the still global recession. However,  there was some very high quality lifting, especially from North Korea.

 

General Impressions

 

At the opening ceremony the General Secretary of the Asian Weightlifting Federation made note of the high level of achievements in Asian weightlifting: 13 of 15 gold medals awarded at the 2012 London Olympics went to Asian lifters. The top Chinese lifters were preparing for the National Games in September; consequently, a provincial team was sent to this competition. Only one of the Kazakhstan gold medalists attended the competition, Sevetlan Podobedova. She was obviously not training. Neither of the European London gold medalists competed at the 2103 European championships.

 

However, all four of the PRK medalists competed in Astana. The four medalists not only competed here, but all were in top form.

RYANG Chun Hwu (PRK). Charniga photo

 

Even though the attendance was rather low, to paraphrase the axiom of college football coaches, the Asians were not resting or regrouping; they were reloading. Hence, there lies one of the core reasons so many in Europe are scratching their heads trying to figure out why the sport is dominated by Asian lifters and this dominance is increasing. There are so many factors to consider to explain fully the European fall from the top of the podium, but some that should be considered are old Euro ideas about training and weightlifting technique, which are essentially one and the same thing.

 

Modern Olympic weightlifting is evolving in this era where the possibility of employing pharmacological assistance to train, develop muscle mass and to perform the weightlifting exercises has been so greatly curtailed that the records, especially the male records in the clean and jerk up to 1988, are so unattainable; they have long since faded into a distant memory (see A De-masculinization of Stength, www.Sportivnypress.com). Those whose ideas were formed and are still rooted in the pharmacological era are the furthest behind the times.

 

The Women

 

48 kg class

Athlete

Nat

Bdywt

S

J

Total

London total

  • RYANG Chun Hwu

PRK

47.10

80

110

190

192

  • AGUSTIANI Sri Wahyuni

INA

47.50

76

100

176

  • HOAI Do Thi Thu

VIE

47.80

78

96

174

 

AGUSTIANI Sri Wahyuni (INA) descends under 109 kg. Charniga photo

 

AGUSTIANI Sri Wahyuni (INA) was the first of the top three in the snatch with an easy 71 kg opener. There were only six lifters in this class, but the 2012 Olympic bronze medalist from PRK was one of them. The first of the Vietnamese girls PHAM was next with a yank and sit down 73 miss. HOAI Do Thi Thu (VIE) followed with a smooth 75 kg. AGUSTIANI Sri Wahyuni (INA) followed with a modern jump back and low squat success at 76. Mamotova (KAZ) made a jump forward with a lean forward 77 on her 2nd. HOAI Do Thi Thu (VIE) dropped low with 78, paused then recovered on her 2nd.

 

HOAI Do Thi Thu (VIE). Charniga photo.

 

RYANG Chun Hwu (PRK) pulled back, jumped back for an easy 80 kg 1st. AGUSTIANI Sri Wahyuni (INA) seemed to have 80 up but lost it backward. Likewise Mamotova (KAZ) could not jump under her 80. Eighty proved a treacherous weight as HOAI Do Thi Thu (VIE) was also unable to cope with it. RYANG Chun Hwu (PRK) went to 84, pulled and sat without a lot of effort so the weight drifted backwards; she repeated with this weight, but the 3rd was even worse.

 

Mamotova’s (KAZ) pulled forward, jumped forward, leaned forward and jerk forward technique was successful only with her opening weight of 90 kg. PHAM (VIE) missed 95, struggled to clean, then jerked forward for another miss. Her 3rd with 95 was about the same, but she stepped under the jerk to avoid a zero.

 

HOAI Do Thi Thu (VIE) opened with 96 kg. She cleaned it well but jerked forward for a miss. The next 96 was cleaned even better but the jerk attempt was terrible. FENG Linmei (CHN), the first representative of what was obviously a Chinese ‘C’ level team, missed all three with 96. Her two misses with 96 were very poor attempts at a squat jerk. HOAI Do Thi Thu (VIE) cleaned 96 with a slight hop forward, jerked quickly and managed to save this lift and avoid a zero.  AGUSTIANI Sri Wahyuni (INA) toyed with her opening 100 kg with the best clean and jerk technique of the class. RYANG Chun Hwu (PRK) made a slow pull and deliberate powerful jerk with 105. AGUSTIANI Sri Wahyuni (INA) took a relatively huge jump to 109 kg which she could not even begin to shoulder.  She repeated with this weight and pulled it to her chest well but was unable to rise from the squat.

 

RYANG Chun Hwu (PRK) with 110 kg 3rd attempt jerk. Charniga photo

 

RYANG Chun Hwu (PRK) moved to 110 kg with another slow, deliberate clean and a careful jerk which she could not hold at arms length. She repeated with this weight;  she struggled to rise from the squat and made a very careful deliberate jerk to total 190 kg, only 2 kg less than her bronze medal result ten months earlier in London. RYANG’s performance was to be repeated throughout the competition because the men and women of PRK team were all in top form; not one of the PRK lifters was to take it easy.

 

53 kg class

Athlete

Nat

Bdywt

S

J

Total

London total

  • GUO Jinyan

CHN

52.90

90

112

202

  • THUY Nguyen Thi

VIE

52.25

80

107

187

195

  • Sisoeva Marina

UZB

53.00

80

106

186

0 (48 kg)

 

 

This was another small class with only six athletes. THUY Nguyen Thi (VIE) opened with a press-out miss at 78 kg. She wobbled a little but made it all right on her next attempt. Sisoeva Marina (UZB), who zeroed in London at 48 kg, was up a weight class. She had 80 kg up easily, but it was a little in front and she did not sink down low to save it. She almost power snatched on her next attempt, a good example of wasted strength and a wasted attempt. THUY Nguyen Thi (VIE) took a modest increase to 80 and sank low to stabilize it. Margarita Yelisyeva (KAZ) made an explosive pull forward, jump forward, lean forward lift with 82 kg on her 2nd.

 

Sisoeva Marina (UZB). Charniga photo.

 

Sisoeva Marina (UZB) jumped to 85 kg and this time she tried to sink low but the weight drifted backwards. Margarita Yelisyeva (KAZ) made another slightly forward lift  of 85 on her 3rd. GUO Jinyan (CHN) opened with 86 kg for an easy lift. For her next, 90 kg was noticeably slower, but it was still a solid lift. This slow lifting (especially a slow descent) with almost no foot movement technique would not work on her 3rd with 93 kg.

 

THUY Nguyen Thi (VIE) at the low point but not yet slowed down. Charniga photo.

 

Margarita Yelisyeva (KAZ) did a pull forward, jump forward and lean forward recovery clean; then a jerk forward as she opened with 98 kg. That is all she  because with the 3rd of 102 she did a forward shifting deadlift and dropped it.  Sisoeva Marina (UZB) cleaned 101 kg high and adjusted her grip then made an explosive split under the barbell for a good lift with 101.

 

GUO Jinyan (CHN). Charniga photo.

GUO Jinyan (CHN) opened with a routine 105 in the clean and jerk. THUY Nguyen Thi (VIE) followed with the same weight and made a likewise routine lift. Sisoeva Marina (UZB) sat backwards with her 2nd at 106. She took it again, almost power cleaning it, for a good lift. THUY Nguyen Thi (VIE) had to step forward with 107 in the recovery; then she jerked forward, only to be turned down for press out. Her third at the same weight was a solid lift which moved her into second place. GUO Jinyan (CHN) jerked 108 a little forward after a struggle in the clean. Her 3rd at 112 was much better and this secured first place.

58 kg class

Athlete

Nat

Bdywt

S

J

Total

London total

  • KUO Hsing -Chun

TPE

57.92

102

134

236

228

  • RI Jong Hwa

PRK

57.18

105

130

235

  • JONG Chun Mi

PRK

57.62

104

130

234

231

 

RI Jong Hwa (PRK). Charniga photo.

The 58 kg class featured two PRK lifters and KUO Hsing –Chun (TPE). Both KUO and Jong lifted in London.  RI Jong Hwa (PRK) was the first of the three favorites up with 100 kg. She sat low, paused a second to make a smooth success.  JONG Chun Mi (PRK) followed with the same weight. Not particularly fast, she muscled under the bar with an obvious press out for no lift. JONG Chun Mi (PRK) pulled back, jumped back and sank very low for a faster good lift on her 2nd.

One hundred two kg brought out KUO Hsing –Chun (TPE). She made a pull forward good lift with this weight to move ahead of both PRK lifters. JONG Chun Mi (PRK) made another jump back low squat success with 104 to go into the lead. RI Jong Hwa (PRK) made a slight hop back, a slow but low squat under a good lift with 105 to regain the lead. KUO Hsing –Chun (TPE) powered up 105 but jumped forward too far and lost the weight behind. She took the same weight for her 3rd, with less hop forward and less effort into the squat but did not even lock the weight overhead. Lifting from a low squat reminiscent of the Japanese frog, style RI Jong Hwa (PRK) hopped back with 108; she sank very low and the weight drifted back for no lift.

JONG Chun Mi (PRK). Charniga photo.

After the snatch the two PRK lifters were ahead and both were lighter than KUO. RI Jong Hwa (PRK) was first up in the clean and jerk with 130 kg. Starting from a low squat, Ri pulled the weight in, bounced a few times then stood with balance slightly forward. And that was the trajectory of the barbell in the jerk. JONG Chun Mi (PRK) took the same 130, pulled back, jumped back then followed with a wide, unstable split under the bar, but, nonetheless, it was a good lift. RI Jong Hwa (PRK) returned for her 2nd at 130; she sat very low, bounced three times, before waiting several seconds to make sure of her balance to jerk the weight. She almost lost this weight in an unstable split but managed to hold on for a good lift.

KUO Hsing –Chun (TPE). Charniga photo.

KUO Hsing –Chun (TPE) pulled 131 forward, hopped forward and jerked forward. She managed to step under it to move into first place in the jerk. JONG Chun Mi (PRK) went to 133 on her 2nd. She sat back a little in the clean, struggled to stand then made a slow half squat in a terrible effort to jerk it.

RI Jong Hwa (PRK) cleaned 133 with another multi-bounce effort. Her the jerk was way forward and not even close. JONG Chun Mi (PRK) made a much easier clean with 133 on her third yet seemed to have no coordination in the jerk. KUO Hsing –Chun (TPE) took 134 for her 2nd to go ahead of both PRK lifters. She pulled forward, hopped forward; first her right knee went down, then her left. For a moment she started to stand up from a kneeling position before deciding  to drop it. Taking the same weight on her 3rd KUO managed to keep both knees off the platform and jerked it well for the win.

KUO Hsing –Chun (TPE) lifted six kilos more than in London; JONG Chun Mi (PRK)  totaled three kilos more than in London, but her unsuccessful attempts would have added up to a six kilo increase.  This scene would be repeated later in the competition: the PRK paired a newcomer with one of their Olympians. They would fight it out between them and with the other lifters for the gold. In this case the Olympian JONG was beaten by RI, so there was no resting on past laurels for her.

 

 

63 kg  class

Athlete

Nat

Bdywt

S

J

Total

London total

  • LIN Tzu Chi

TPE

60.85

110

133

243

  • JO Pok Hyang

PRK

6.75

103

133

236

  • WU Linying

CHN

62.35

100

122

222

 

None of the top three in this weight class, LIN Tzu Chi (TPE), JO Pok Hyang (PRK) or WU Linying (CHN) competed in London, nevertheless the quality of lifting was very high. WU Linying (CHN) and Goricheva Karina (KAZ) both opened with very strong 95 kg lifts, neither really bottoming out in the squat. Goricheva Karina (KAZ) went to 100 kg for a little, shaky jump forward, lean forward lift. WU Linying (CHN) hopped back and sat low and slow to make 100.

JO Pok Hyang (PRK) opened with 103. She like most Koreans has what is called brachio-morphic body proportions. This is a body type defined as longer trunk in proportion to upper and lower extremities. It was believed they have a slight advantage because the shoulders pass through on an average 2º larger arc in lifting the barbell. She pulled the weight in easily and sat very low, but her highly elastic physique let the barbell drift backwards. Her 2nd was a repeat of her 1rst attempt. Now on the ropes, she had to make 103 on her third. This time she sat low for several seconds shifting backwards and forwards until she was sure of her balance; then she recovered for a good lift. 

  

JO Pok Hyang (PRK). Charniga photo.

Goricheva Karina (KAZ) made a small hop forward lift with 104 for her 3rd. WU Linying (CHN) pulled in her 3rd at 104, hopped back and sat low but could not control the barbell drifting backwards. LIN Tzu Chi (TPE) finally appeared with 105. She made it with a step forward without a very deep squat. She hopped forward slightly on her next weight at 110 but had to run forward until she eventually ran out of platform. LIN was back on the platform in less than 30 seconds. This time she moved the barbell backwards a little so that when she ran forward several steps she was still on the platform for a good lift.

Goricheva Karina (KAZ) seemed to have lost it when she deadlifted her first attempt 122. WU Linying (CHN) made this same weight with no problem with her bent back knee in the jerk. Goricheva Karina (KAZ) hopped forward at least 8 cm in making a strong clean but jerked the weight forward for her repeat at 122. Unfortunately, she repeated the same mistake on her third and failed to total. WU Linying (CHN) seemed to decelerate 126 briefly as it reached knee height then cleaned well but her bent back knee went right to the floor in the jerk. She failed to recover from the clean with this weight on her 3rd.

WU Linying (CHN) with bent rear leg jerk. Charniga photo.

One hundred thirty three kilos brought out the two leaders. JO Pok Hyang (PRK) made a strong clean with a step forward to get balanced which was followed with a poor, forward shifting effort in the jerk.

LIN Tzu Chi (TPE) made a hop forward, lean forward, step forward; she finally made a jerk forward with 133 on her 1st with a wide split to get the bar back behind her head. JO Pok Hyang (PRK) repeated with 133 with a much stronger clean and a powerful but shaky jerk. LIN Tzu Chi (TPE) went to 141 kg for a hop forward lean forward clean. She jerked it to arms length and held it overhead for a couple of seconds, but it was too far forward to hold.  JO Pok Hyang (PRK) failed to shoulder 141 on her third and LIN passed her third attempt.

LIN Tzu Chi (TPE) cleaned this near world record but failed to hold the jerk. Charniga photo.

It is worth noting, both of these young women had attempted weights within two kilos of the current world record of 143 kg in the clean and jerk.

 

69 kg class

Athlete

Nat

Bdywt

S

J

Total

London total

  • RYO Un Hui

PRK

68.50

118

145

263

  • RIM Jong Sim

PRK

68.75

112

143

255

261

  • YU Ying

CHN

68.55

100

128

228

 

This class featured the London Olympic champion 20 year old RIM Jong Sim (PRK) and her 19 year old teammate RYO Un Hui (PRK). If you are thinking in the past tense, the obvious strategy here would be to let these two cruise to an easy gold and silver and not risk damage to two very high class lifters. Essentially that is what the Russians did with some of their lifters at the 2013 European championships.

However, the Russians did not win one gold medal in London. Since the 2000 Olympics (inclusive) they have won only one Olympic gold (105 kg class in 2004) and cannot claim one female Olympic gold medalist.

YU Ying (CHN) sits low with 100 kg. Charniga photo.

YU Ying (CHN) was the first of the top three to start in the snatch with 100 kg. She had it up easily but did not sink low to secure it. She sank low on her next with this weight for a good lift. For YU Ying (CHN) 102 3rd attempt was a repeat of her 1st. RIM Jong Sim (PRK) the Olympic champion opened with 112 kg. With a small hop back she lost the weight behind partly because of her flexibility. It is more difficult for a very flexible female lifter like RIM to control a barbell in the snatch because her large range of joint movements which also means she experiences less resistance to such large movement possibilities. She stopped in the low squat with the same weight on her 2nd before recovery and a good lift.

RYO Un Hui (PRK) beat her Olympic champion teamate by 8 kgs. Charniga photo.

RYO Un Hui (PRK) RIM’s 19 year old teammate opened with smooth, cautious attempt at 113 kg. She is not as flexible in the hip and ankles as RIM but still very flexible in upper extremities. A little too rubbery RIM lost her 3rd backwards like her first. RYO Un Hui (PRK) hopped back, sank low with her next lift at 116 kg, stopped and shifted back and forth for balance, then recovered. Her 3rd with 118 kg was almost identical and this put RIM down six kilos.

YU Ying (CHN) opened with 125 kg in the jerk pulled the weight to her chest, then dumped it forward. She corrected this mistake on her repeat and made an easy lift. She went to 128 another good lift. It was obvious the Chinese were just hoping to get bronze in this class.

The leader RYO Un Hui (PRK) opened first with 142 kg. She struggled in the clean by almost dropping the weight off her chest; nevertheless, she made a powerful jerk. RIM Jong Sim (PRK) opened with a good 143 kg to go into the lead in the jerk. RYO Un Hui (PRK) made a harder clean with 145 but once again a very strong jerk to take an insurmountable lead. RIM Jong Sim (PRK) countered with 146 kg. She sat very low, bounced four times to recover. Her jerk was forward and she tried to step under to no avail. RYO Un Hui (PRK) took the same 146 but despite several bounces could not stand with this weight. RIM Jong Sim (PRK) repeated with 146 kg and just buckled under the clean for no lift.

RIM Jong Sim (PRK) moves under 146 kg. Charniga photo.

This was the most interesting class of the whole competition. RIM who totaled six kilos less than her winning result in London was beaten by RYO, who totaled 2 kg more than RIM’s gold medal result. Probably the best example of an Asian reload was this class: the champion received no special treatment, could not rest on her laurels, no taking it easy for a medal, no special respect. Neither athlete did just enough to win the gold and silver; they had to fight it out amongst themselves for the championship of the PRK team.  Both lifters looked as if they began lifting with weights about 98% of their maximum.

 

75 kg class

Athlete

Nat

Bdywt

S

J

Total

London total

  • Nurmukhambet. Anna

KAZ

74.95

114

135

249

251 (69 kg)

  • WANG Ya-Jhen

TPE

71.95

103

128

231

  • LIN Tingting

CHN

74.25

104

127

231

KIM UnJu

PRK

74.60

113

152

 

WANG Ya-Jhen (TPE). Charniga photo.

WANG Ya-Jhen (TPE) opened with a very easy 90 kg snatch. She followed this with another easy lift at 96 kg. LIN Tingting (CHN) made a no foot movement with 99 kg on her 1st. She sank very low, paused then stood for her 2nd at 103. WANG Ya-Jhen (TPE) made the same 103 with a stop at the bottom. LIN Tingting (CHN) made a pause at the bottom 3rd attempt with 104 to move ahead by one kilo.

Nurmukhambetova Anna (KAZ). Charniga photo.

Nurmukhambetova Anna (KAZ) had to step forward on her opener with 110 kg. KIM UnJu (PRK), who declared a 152 kg 1st attempt in the clean and jerk, went to 113 and had it up briefly then dropped it behind. She took this same weight and this time held it aloft for a couple of seconds before it too dropped backwards. With her back against the wall KIM’s final lift with 113 was not close as it was dropped in front. Nurmukhambetova Anna (KAZ) struggled for several seconds at the bottom with 114 kg, one kilo less than she made in London at 69 kg, before recovering to take a healthy lead in the snatch. She passed on her third attempt.

LIN Tingting (CHN). Charniga photo.

LIN Tingting (CHN) who opened with 121 kg, jerked it well after a big step forward. WANG Ya-Jhen (TPE) had no problem with her 1st at 122. LIN Tingting (CHN) struggled a little with the clean but made another fine jerk with 126. WANG Ya-Jhen (TPE), obviously lifting well within herself, moved ahead in the jerk with an easy 127 kg. LIN Tingting (CHN) had to split very wide and struggle to control her final 127. WANG Ya-Jhen (TPE) made 128 with no problem, just enough to move ahead in the jerk.Nurmukhambetova Anna (KAZ) cleaned 130 well but was lucky to hold the forward jerk. Her next with 135 was a little better but not  very good technique on the jerk. She cleaned her 3rd with 137 kg with a big struggle and had nothing left for the jerk.

KIM UnJu (PRK). Charniga photos.

Now comes the not so strange part of this narrative. Even had Nurmukhambetova  made the 137 all that was needed to cinch the gold medal in the clean and jerk was 138. Nevertheless, KIM UnJu (PRK) continued on in the jerk after a zero in the snatch by sticking with the original declared first attempt of 152 kg.

After a hard pull to the chest, KIM stood well but made a poor effort in the jerk by sending the bar way forward. Following herself in 1.5 minutes, she hopped back, struggled a little to stand, jerked it to arms length and held it briefly as she recovered her rear foot; however, again she dropped the barbell forward.  KIM was back to the platform in 1.5 minutes for the third attempt at 152. Hopping back to clean, she took a step forward in the recovery. Now standing with her balance obviously close to her toes, she jerked the barbell forward to arms length only to lose it behind as she over stepped under it.

Most top level teams at this juncture, only 10 months after the Olympic Games, would have had their athlete take the 138 to at least guarantee one gold medal in this class and, maybe, just call it a day. Not this team, they were here to reload. So, KIM started with what looked like 98% weights and had to struggle, thus following herself to the platform each time.

 

 

+75 kg class

Athlete

Nat

Bdywt

S

J

Total

London total

  • Aborneva Alexandra

KAZ

102.80

110

143

253

  • VAN Nguyen Thi Kim

VIE

102.65

106

136

242

  • Khenjantuek Praeonapa

THA

115.30

101

141

242

 

This class was really anticlimactic relative to the rest of the women’s categories. The results were relatively low. Aborneva Alexandra (KAZ) had no problems since some other top women were not here. The Chinese had no entry and with only seven entries it points to a problem with the qualification system for the Olympics and at the same time an image conundrum for weightlifting sport.

Khenjantuek Praeonapa (THA) Aborneva Alexandra (KAZ). Charniga photos.

VAN Nguyen Thi Kim (VIE). Charniga photo.

This class typically has a low turnout. However, over the years teams which otherwise have been noncompetitive or have long lost their competitiveness such as the USA have sought to qualify athletes for the Olympics by sending two athletes to the 75 and +75 kg classes so that they are able to score qualification points by virtue of anticipated fewer entries and a quick drop off in quality after the medalists in the two heavier women classes.

For instance, one team qualified a female for the Olympics at the 2012 Asian championships with their four lifters designated for points entered (two each) in the 75 and +75 kg classes. There were only seven lifters in the +75 kg and 9 in the 75 kg class. Consequently, those four athletes (two who totaled less than 100 kgs) were able to score sufficient qualification points because of low turn outs. Initially Vietnam did not qualify a slot for London even though they had two female lifters total more than 200 kg (twice that of the other team’s token point scorers).

This year Vietnam entered a female in the +75 kg, sporting obvious excessive adipose tissue, presumably to be able to score more points in this class because of fewer entries.

Few women want to add superfluous bodyweight. And the spectacle of a huge female with excessive adipose tissue competing in weightlifting creates a profoundly negative public image for our sport. It sends the wrong message to young women; they could find weightlifting sport interesting, but they see some of these obsese athletes and are turned off. Creating conditions under which one can gain acceptance, i.e., being able to compete internationally with an unjustifiable, unhealthy and excess body mass can only give women’s weightlifting a black eye.

 

A good example is the USA qualification for the 2012 Olympics in which one athlete gained 12 kg of bodyweight to make a marginal total and earn an Olympic berth over a much more qualified lighter lifter (see table). The qualification system was based on average totals over a period of years instead of some rational, percentage of total to the current best results in each weight class or the relative percentage of the current world record for each weight class.

 

Qualification results for 2012 USA Olympic berth revealing averaging of totals favors the heavier weight class.

Competition

Date

Bdywt

Snatch

C&J

Total

WR

%

1st2011

%

H.M.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

US Nat

7/17/2011

149.85

107

130

237

328

72.3

328

72.3

AM. Open

12/1/2011

155.64

114

135

259

328

79.0

328

79.0

FDU Open

1/14/2012

158.35

110

140

250

328

76.2

328

76.2

US Nat

3/5/2012

161.96

110

145

255

328

77.7

328

77.7

147/182 1st

 

 

75%

80%

 

 

 

Sinc.

255.0

2012 OG

8/3/12

157.04

105

135

240

333

 

 

 

A. S.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WWC

2010

57.85

87

109

196

251

78.0

237

82.7

WWC

2011

57.16

89

107

196

251

78.0

237

82.7

US Nat

2011

58.0

86

100

186

251

74.1

237

78.5

US Nat

2012

57.69

89

108

197

251

78.5

237

83.1

102/135

 

 

87%

81%

 

 

 

Sinc.

259.84

 

In this particular case, one female athlete increased her total to qualify under highly questionable standards while gaining 12 kgs of bodyweight. The better athlete stayed home and a 162 kg female athlete went to London instead.

With this point in mind, at the end of this year’s championships, it was surprising to find Kuwait in third place for the team championship. They had eight lifters, five of whom were in the three heaviest weight classes. All of their lifters placed last or next to last and in several cases their lifters took one attempt in each exercise and retired from the remaining attempts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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